MEET THE INTERNS>>ALEX

Click on Alex's picture to learn more about becoming the next Campbell House intern!

Click on Alex’s picture to learn more about becoming the next Campbell House intern!

Not all the work to be done by our volunteers and interns happens here at the Campbell House. Our next intern introduction, Alex, is hard at work parsing through archives as part of our ongoing search for Campbell-related legal documents. Here is Alex…

What are you studying and where? A BA in History at UMSL.

Why Campbell House? Because it is where I was assigned [Ed. note: Well, yes, we do like to keep on UMSL’s radar, so they’ll direct interns in our direction who have never heard or thought about us before. You don’t have to know anything about Campbell House to do valuable work here!].

What are you working on at CHM? I am working on the Campbell Family Legal Legacy Project [Ed. note: We’ve noted before this involves trips to the St. Louis Circuit Court and Missouri State Archives office to dig up old files].

When you aren’t having a blast at Campbell House, what are you doing? Hanging out with friends and family. I enjoy movies, traveling, theater, and hiking!

What is your favorite thing about CHM so far? I have loved looking through all the old documents at the Missouri State archives.

iPhone or Android? Actually, I have a Windows phone [Take that, Apple and Google!].

Favorite color? Blue&Green

Favorite band/singer? Frank Turner

Andy Warhol said that everyone gets their 15 minutes of fame. What happened in your 15 minutes? I was in the newspaper as a child visiting the Magic House.

If you could be teleported anywhere in the world right now, where would you go? I would love to see Machu Pichu in Peru.

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MEET THE INTERNS>>JAMES

Click James' picture to learn more about becoming a Campbell House intern, and exploring St. Louis history!

Click James’ picture to learn more about becoming a Campbell House intern, and exploring St. Louis history!

Last time you met Caitie; now its time to meet James! James is diving deep into the history of the house, and also prepping to carry on our application for National Historic Landmark status. We’ll let James take it from here…

What are you studying and where? I am studying History and French at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Why Campbell House? I definitely wanted to do a history internship before graduating in December 2016, and the History Department placed me at this great museum and historical residence. I was unfamiliar with the Campbell House before my internship but I am eager to delve into its past.

What are you working on at CHM? Currently, I am studying the history of the house and the Campbells in order to give tours, while my internship project will be researching and amending documents toward the Campbell House Museum’s application to become a National Historic Landmark (carrying on an internship project that will continue for several more years).

When you aren’t having a blast at Campbell House, what are you doing? Usually, I am too busy with homework to do much else! However, in my free time I enjoy biking around our great city, vegetable gardening, singing karaoke, cooking, and partaking in the great microbrewery culture of St. Louis.

What is your favorite thing about CHM so far? So far, my favorite part about the Campbell House Museum is the decor. One of my favorite periods in history is the Victorian Era and to be immersed in a room like the Campbell’s parlor transports me back to that time.

iPhone or Android? Haha, currently neither. I have an old cell phone and have yet to upgrade to a smart phone. I will soon though, probably [One of our staff members recently “bit the bullet”, so to say, and made that transition recently too. The ranks of the “dumb phones” dwindle…].

Favorite color? My favorite color is green because it is the color of plants.

Favorite band/singer? David Bowie was and is my favorite musician. I was shocked like everyone else when he recently passed away, though the public outpouring of sympathy and respect for him and his music was impressive and comforting [The Groniger Museum in the Netherlands is representing museums well by extending hours to an exhibit they have about Bowie].

Andy Warhol said that everyone gets their 15 minutes of fame. What happened in your 15 minutes? I would hope it involves a sci-fi book that I am writing, and hopefully I’d be famous for how good it is rather than its wonderful abilities as a paperweight.

If you could live in a book, which one and why? I would live in a world of The Phantom Tollbooth. I first read it in grade school over 20 years ago, and still I wish I could eat words, mine for numbers, keep sounds in boxes, and listen to a symphony play music that paints the skies.

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“Freeze or Not”

Roman Punch

Roman Punch

Grate the rinds of 12 lemons, & 2 oranges on 2 lbs of loaf sugar, & squeeze on the juice, cover it, and stand until next day, then strain it through a sieve, add a bottle of champagne & the whites of 8 eggs beaten to a froth. Freeze or not.

The Campbells would receive deliveries of ice frequently. They placed it within their icebox, where it would stay for a relatively long time, keeping the Campbell's food from spoiling.

The Campbells would receive deliveries of ice frequently. They placed it within their icebox, where it would stay for a relatively long time, keeping the Campbell’s food from spoiling.

The recent release of The Gilded Table has all of us here at the Campbell House Museum thinking about food and drink. While looking over Virginia’s original handwritten recipe for Roman Punch, what struck us was that last line: “Freeze or not.” Just how did the Campbells freeze their Roman Punch?

The answer is surprisingly simple. Iced desserts were popular in Europe as early as the 18th century. The desired mixture was simply poured into a sabotiere (also known as a sorbetière), a pewter pot. The pot was then placed into a bucket and surrounded by ice and salt. Some recipes called for stirring the contents occasionally to ensure that it congealed equally, but otherwise, that was it.

The same process could be done with the set of ice cream molds located in the Campbell kitchen today. Once the cream had begun to congeal, it could be placed in the molds, sealed with lard and wrapped in paper, and then surrounded by ice and salt. When it came time for serving, the ice cream would be hard enough to hold its shape. Campbell servants could simply garnish the ice cream with frozen fruit, and Voila!

Chocolate ice cream, sugar cookies, and antique ice cream molds and maker in the Campbell kitchen. Photo from “The Gilded Table”

Frozen foods were very much a luxury food. While these recipes are not necessarily labor intensive (particularly after the invention of the hand-cranked ice cream in 1843), they require ice and ice boxes to work. This meant that only the wealthy could enjoy them, and the Campbells were certainly that.

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