Meet the Interns » Rachel

Intern Rachel! Click her image to learn more about internships at the Campbell House Museum.

Intern Rachel! Click her image to learn more about internships at the Campbell House Museum.

Meet Rachel – CHM’s third summer intern.  She’s originally from St. Louis, but this summer Rachel came all the way from RIT in Rochester, New York to spend a couple months with us (which we think is pretty snazzy) and has been doing some great work with our collection!

What are you studying and where?  I’m studying Museum Studies and Hospitality Management and Tourism (try saying that three times fast!) at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) in Rochester, New York.

Why Campbell House?  I thought it would be an interesting place to work and learn about the history of the Campbells.  Even though CHM is small, it has a lot of treasures worth seeing!

What are you working on at CHM?  I’m working on the annual collections inventory – I go through every room armed with a laptop and three notepads to ensure that the inventory is up to date.  I account for every object in CHM’s collection.

When you aren’t having a blast at Campbell House, what are you doing?  Video games, reading, mulling about characters from TV shows (I just started watching Orange is the New Black on Netflix!)

What is your favorite thing about CHM thus far?  Seeing the objects up close in person – it’s interesting how some objects have different physical appearances from the 1800s compared to the ones in this century.

One of the THOUSANDS of objects Rachel has inventoried this summer. The inventory is no small task - everything from the smallest spoons to the largest pieces of furniture have to be accounted for and their collections files have to be updated to reflect new locations, additions, and conditions.

One of the THOUSANDS of objects Rachel has inventoried this summer. The inventory is no small task – everything from the smallest spoons to the largest pieces of furniture have to be accounted for and their collections files have to be updated to reflect new locations, additions, and conditions.

iPhone or Android?  Android.

Favorite color?  Purple.

Favorite band?  The Beatles.

Little know fact about yourself?  I can wiggle my ears!

Which of Snow White’s Seven Dwarfs describes you best and why?  Happy describes me best because I’m an optimistic person.  I like to make people happy even if it’s just listening to them rant about things.

Want to check out some of the fun stuff Rachel has been working with this Summer?  The Campbell collection is fully accessible online!  Click here to access object files and get the dirt on your favorite Campbell goodies.

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Meet the Interns » Amanda

Amanda

Intern Amanda! Click her image to learn more about internships at the Campbell House Museum.

Next up on Campbell House’s roster of summer interns is Amanda, who’s staying in St. Louis for the summer in order to work on some great projects with us.  Though she’s originally from the Metro-East, her family moved down south several years ago and we’re happy to welcome her back to her hometown!  Amanda is also our resident sports enthusiast, most recently keeping us in the loop on Team USA’s performance in the World Cup with a snazzy live-feed app on her phone that had us cheering and jeering for most of the afternoon.

What are you studying and where? I’m working on my Masters in Public History at North Carolina State University.

Why Campbell House? The Museum’s website had great images and I am interested in the house’s time period.

What are you working on at CHM? Currently, lots of reading.  I’m also doing an inventory/survey of the Museum’s archive.

When you aren’t having a blast at Campbell House, what are you doing? Reading by a pool or visiting historic sites and attractions throughout St. Louis.

As a side note: don't mess with Amanda.  She's always armed with a super-sharp pencil (the electric sharpener has been used more in the past few weeks than it's probably ever been used before).

As a side note: don’t mess with Amanda.  She’s always armed with a super-sharp pencil (the electric sharpener has been used more in the past few weeks than it’s probably ever been used before).

What is your favorite thing about CHM so far? Learning more about my hometown’s history and meeting like-minded individuals.

iPhone or Android? iPhone.

Favorite color? Green.

Favorite band? Mumford & Sons.

Little known fact about yourself? College football is my favorite sport.

If you could be one for just 24 hours, what cereal box cartoon character would you be? Why? Captain Crunch, because then I would own a boat and get to wear a cool hat.

 

 

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CHM: Then and Now

Over the past few months, we’ve been posting some “Then and Now” images on Facebook and Twitter, showing how the Campbell House has evolved over its 70 years as a museum.  This House has gone through a few different color schemes, restorations, and more crazy wallpaper prints than we sometimes care to admit!  Click through the images below to see what we mean.

This time we thought we’d dive in a little deeper and look at how one of our favorite rooms, the Morning Room, has changed over a few different eras.

Bird-tastic stained glass window on the Morning Room's east wall.

Bird-tastic stained glass window on the Morning Room’s east wall.

The Morning Room got its name because it was mainly used (you guessed it!) in the morning.  Sunlight comes in through the beautiful, east-facing stained glass windows and gives the room a sort of glow until about midday.  The room served also served as a

less formal family room-type parlor, because the big, flashy, red and gold behemoth that you can see in the middle photo above was really just for entertaining (and impressing) guests.  CHM’s morning room served as a place for the Campbell family members to go in the morning: to write their letters, read their newspapers, slurp their coffee, etc. but it also was useful to servants because it kept the Campbells out of their hair for a while.  Generally nineteenth century servants weren’t permitted to  in the same room as the family members unless one of them was ill, so having a space where servants knew the Campbells would consistently spend a chunk of their morning allowed them free range of the upper floors to make beds, empty chamber pots (wahoo!) and get ready for the day without having to worry about a family member walking in on them and interrupting their work.

The Morning Room was originally chock-full of stuff ranging from marble busts to taxidermied birds, and most of it can still be found in exactly (or pretty close to) in today’s pictures.  Click through the images below and watch the Morning Room’s progress from the 1880s to the present – see if you can find which objects have moved, which ones are missing today, and which ones are sitting in the same exact spot 160 years later!

 

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Meet the Interns » JAMIE

Summer has arrived in St. Louis, which means a new group of wonderful students interns have started with the Campbell House!  Interns play an important role at CHM throughout the year – giving tours of the house, working on special projects, and being a helpful extra set of hands around the Museum.  Over the next few weeks you’ll get to know all four of the interns we have here for Summer 2014, starting today with Jamie!

Jamie

Intern Jamie! Click to learn more about internships at the Campbell House Museum.

What are you studying and where?  English and Education at Truman State University.

Why Campbell House?  My aunts brought me on tours here with a member of the Campbell House Board of Directors and I fell in love with the histories.

What are you working on at CHM?  I’m transcribing letters and lists from Robert Campbell and assembling pieces of an index for future researchers to use.

When you aren’t having a blast at Campbell House, what are you doing?  Reading, playing piano, pestering my family and pets, and working at Family Video. I’m really easy to please and entertain.

What is your favorite thing about CHM thus far?  All of the stories and learning more about the REAL people they apply to.

iPhone or Android?  Well… iPhone… But I own both. My phone is Apple but my laptop is PC and my tablet is Android. I make it work.

Favorite color?  Purple… which is part of the reason why I chose to go to my college.

Favorite band?  Don’t make me choose! It really depends on my mood. In honor of them making a movie I’ll say Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons but I don’t have one favorite.

Little known fact about yourself?  I’m generally known as the “mom” of whatever group I’m in and I’m a cat lover.

Based on something you’ve already done, how might you make it into the Guinness Book of World Records?  The number of days every year a person can be sunburnt.

 

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Our Fellow Campbell House(s)

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Home Sweet Home, CHM in STL.

The Campbell House Museum in St. Louis, Missouri is, as you probably already know, a pretty incredible place.  Built in 1851 and the home of fur trader and entrepreneur Robert Campbell and his family from 1854 to 1938, the house contains a nearly complete collection of the Campbells’ original furnishings and has been painstakingly restored over the past decade to reach its current state as one of the best-restored 19th Century buildings in America.  But did you know we aren’t alone?  We share the name “Campbell House Museum” with two other institutions in North America, one older than CHM St. Louis and one newer.  Though our stories are quite a bit different from one another, they’re all pretty darn interesting.
Read on to find out more…


 

Campbell House Museum (1898)
Spokane, Washington

CH with chairs

CHM Spokane, ca. 1898.

We first look up to Spokane, Washington, the grounds of the Northwest Museum of Art and Culture (MAC), and the home of mining magnate Amasa B. Campbell, his wife Grace and daughter Helen.  Campbell made his fortune in mining, beginning with a risky investment of $25,000 in an Idaho gem mine.  That bet paid off and, after moving his mining operations from Idaho to Spokane in 1898, Campbell built a house to match his bank account.  Built in an English Tudor Revival style, the Campbell House Museum in Spokane describes itself as follows:

“The first floor interior, on two levels, provides a sense of drama. To the right of the dark wood-paneled entry hall is a light, gilded French reception room where Grace Campbell received her visitors. To the left, the library’s dark wooden beams and inglenook fireplace provide a cozy atmosphere for informal evenings at home as well

Amasa Campbell and daughter Helen.

Amasa Campbell and daughter Helen.

as formal events. Four steps lead to a large dining room with a fireplace surrounded by blue and white Dutch tiles. A deep veranda around the back of the house affords a view of the Spokane River below. Other features include a den, decorated in the popular Middle Eastern style, well-planned service areas, and four bedrooms upstairs.”

Following her mother’s death in 1924, Helen Campbell donated the house and its grounds to the East Washington Historical Society which used the building as a space for special exhibitions and community events.  After the construction of the MAC, Campbell House Spokane underwent a 2001 restoration that has brought it back to its original beauty.  For more information on the home of Amasa Campbell and the Northwest Museum of Art and Culture, click the image below or check them out on Facebook.

CHM Spokane

CHM Spokane in the present day. Click to visit their website!


Campbell House Museum (1822)

Toronto, Canada

CHM Toronto in the late 1800s, at that point serving as home to the "Capewell Horse Nail Co."

CHM Toronto in the late 1800s, at that point serving as home to the “Capewell Horse Nail Co.”

Now we’ll head even farther north, to our Canadian friends at the Campbell House Museum of Toronto, originally home to Upper Canada Chief Justice Sir William Campbell and his wife Hannah.  The stately home was built in 1822 and today stands as one of the few remaining structures of the Georgian Palladian style left standing in Canada.  William Campbell is remembered for his important role in presiding over the trial of rioters who destroyed William Lyon Mackenzie’s printing press, a significant early test for freedom of the press in Canada.  The story of the “Types Riot” is quite a read, click here to learn more about it.  The house served as the Campbell Family home until the death of Hannah Campbell in 1844, at which point the house and its contents were auctioned off (Sound familiar? The same thing happened here at CHM St. Louis in 1941 after the death of Hazlett Campbell).  The building then served as a private home, office space and eventually was converted to a factory.

CHM Toronto in the midst of its move in 1972.

CHM Toronto in the midst of its move in 1972.

This is where things get neat – facing demolition in 1972 at its original location, a group of community-minded and historically-interested lawyers got together and paid to MOVE THE WHOLE HOUSE just over 5,000 feet down the street to its current location in downtown Toronto.  Click here to read about that move and see some pretty nifty pictures.  It’s not every day a Georgian mansion goes cruising down Main Street.

Today the Campbell House Museum in Toronto sits safely in its new location, serving both as an early 19th century Toronto history museum as well as a community and event space “to discuss, to create, to perform, and to socialize, giving life to the words Freedom of Expression” and continuing the legacy of Sir William Campbell.  For more information on CHM Toronto, click the image below to visit their website or check them out on Facebook.

Campbell House Toronto. in the present day.  Click to visit their website!

Campbell House Toronto in the present day. Click to visit their website!

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